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Auschwitz Day One

The Neglected History of Auschwitz

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The Neglected History of Auschwitz

By Maggie Kuck, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

I’m staying in a hotel in Auschwitz. No, not the camp, although I can see it from the comfort of a modern lobby. Before my trip to Poland I, like many others, did not know that there was anything
significant that surrounded the former Nazi concentration and death camp.

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Who Will Stand Witness?

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Who Will Stand Witness?

By Cheyenne Paris, Brandeis University

Who will stand witness?
A town an hour west from the city
On an afternoon at the end of May
So close to summer,
the taste is on the air.
The blue of the sky reflected in the eyes of those
walking the cobblestones
biking the narrow streets
framed by buildings
two, three,
four stories.

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Holocaust survivors return home to Oswiecim, only to find their belongings seized and homes inhabited

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Holocaust survivors return home to Oswiecim, only to find their belongings seized and homes inhabited

By Kalen Michals, Simmons Univeristy

The town of Oświęcim, Poland is known worldwide, for it is the location of the most notorious Nazi concentration and death camp: Auschwitz-Birkenau. Although most commonly referred to as Auschwitz, its German translation, the town of Oświęcim was home to many Jews prior to the outbreak of WWII. However, when Holocaust survivors returned home to Oświęcim after liberation, they found their homes and businesses reclaimed by their one-time neighbors.

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Remembering Those Before Us

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Remembering Those Before Us

By Jessie Levine, Simmons University

Only several miles away from the Auschwitz-Birkenau Death Camp, the Auschwitz Jewish
Cemetery holds the memories of the town’s Jews going back generations. Before the German
occupation of Poland, Oświęcim, a small town west of Kraków, had a population of about
12,000 people, 8,000 of them being Jews.

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Oswiecim

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Oswiecim

By Madeline Herrup, Brandeis University

It is difficult to find faith in a town that is coated in a history of darkness.
It is difficult to find faith in a world of darkness.
There images of “there is no god” flow down rivers of sadness, fear, a fear that I don’t specify to this town I mean this world we live in now.

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