Viewing entries in
Auschwitz NYC

A Reminder to Stop and Appreciate

Comment

A Reminder to Stop and Appreciate

by Ryan C, Northeastern University

Being at the Museum of Jewish Heritage and viewing the Auschwitz exhibit was a true privilege. It was a reminder to stop and appreciate that I am alive and I am free.

Comment

Reflecting on the Auschwitz Exhibition

Comment

Reflecting on the Auschwitz Exhibition

by Brittany Sacks, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

For as long as I can remember, the beginning of the back-to-school season meant bringing out our family’s label maker, inputting my name and phone number, and pressing print and cut repeatedly in order to label every textbook, notebook, folder, and new piece of clothing for the year.

Comment

Untold Stories

Comment

Untold Stories

by Kalen Michals, Simmons University

The collection of artifacts presented at “Auschwitz: Not long ago, Not far away” are unlike others I have seen before. Carefully curated, they range from a handmade hair comb to a Torah rescued from a synagogue on Kristallnacht.

Comment

The Evil In Us

Comment

The Evil In Us

by Anuj Apte, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Visiting ‘Auschwitz, Not Long Ago. Not Far Away.’ was an eye opening experience, in the truest sense of the term. The curator of the exhibit made a radical choice by devoting almost a third of the exhibit to the years leading up to the Holocaust.

Comment

The Stories We Tell Ourselves

Comment

The Stories We Tell Ourselves

by Elizabeth Hopkinson, Yale University

I have always loved stories. When I learned to write my full name, I first wrote that string of letters on a library card. I couldn’t read the books on the shelves yet, but even then I realized it wasn’t about the words, it was about the potential.

Comment

Testimony

Comment

Testimony

by Morris Najar, Brandeis University

Testimony:

When I think about both the once shiny and now rusty metals at the Auschwitz Death Camp, I think about the stories they would be able to tell in the darkest time of the 20th century. 

Comment